Films Watched in November 2014 Part I

Madloveposter

madlove-03

Mad Love (1935) Karl Freund
(Rewatch circa 1992)
Warner Archive Instant

Previously discussed here

4/5

enforca_posta

enforca

The Enforcer [aka Murder, Inc.](1951) Bretaigne Windust
Netflix DVD

Previously discussed here

4/5

Cornered

cornered

Cornered (1945) Edward Dmytryk
Warner Archive Instant

Former Royal Canadian Air Force flyer Laurence Gerard (Dick Powell, above right) returns to France to find the killer of his wife, a member of the French Resistance. Powell gives a compelling performance of a man so hungry for vengeance he can’t see anything else. A rock-solid noir with good atmosphere and excellent performances, including Walter Slezak (above left) as the stranger who seems to know far more than he should about Gerard.

4/5

wtse_poster

wtse2

Where the Sidewalk Ends (1950) Otto Preminger
Netflix DVD

Previously discussed here

4.5/5

batman

batman_year1

Batman: Year One (animated 2011) Sam Liu, Lauren Montgomery
Blu-ray

Based on the four-issue run of comics of the same title by Frank Miller and David Mazzucchelli, this animated Batman: Year One has some nice moments, but most of them belong to Gotham police Lieutenant Jim Gordon (voiced by Bryan Cranston) in his first year on the force. Other voices include Katee Sackhoff as a female detective and Eliza Dushku as Selina Kyle/Catwoman. In fact all of the voices deliver superbly with the exception of Benjamin McKenzie as Batman/Bruce Wayne, who seems to be the only actor who acts like he’s making a cartoon movie.

3.5/5

riot-in-cell-block-11-movie-poster-1954-1020459823

Riot-in-Cell-Block-11-1954

Riot in Cell Block 11 (1954) Don Siegel
Criterion Collection Blu-ray

Siegel is one of my favorite directors and Riot in Cell Block 11 was one of his early successes. Filmed at Folsom State Prison with several former inmates, the film has a documentary look and feel to it, yet you’d swear people were really getting hurt in the action scenes. (Maybe they were…) Although the main focus of the film is an awareness of prison overcrowding and poor living conditions, Siegel never gets preachy or too political. If you like prison pictures and have never seen this one, you should.

4/5

dark_passage_ver8_xlg

dark_passage1

Dark Passage (1947) Delmer Daves
Warner Archive Instant

Previously discussed here

3.5/5

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