Jug Face (2013) Chad Crawford Kinkle

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Jug Face (2013)
Written and directed by Chad Crawford Kinkle
Produced by Andrew van den Houten, Robert Tonino
Cinematography by Chris Heinrich
DVD – interlibrary loan (1:21)

I’m not sure where or how I heard about Jug Face. I think it popped up as I was researching something else, but I was intrigued enough to request it through interlibrary loan. You have to understand that I’m not a huge horror fan, so when I looked at the cast on the movie’s DVD cover, I thought I recognized the name Larry Fessenden, but I couldn’t think of any of his films. (I later saw that Fessenden has made many films, including an astounding 26 movies since Jug Face, to say nothing of his work in short films and television.) I did recognize Sean Young’s name, but I figured it was some other Sean Young. To be honest, I got so caught up in the film, I didn’t even recognize her until the film was over. That’s because Jug Face is a film that’s so good it’s easy to get caught up in it.

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TCM Big Screen Classics: North by Northwest (1959) Alfred Hitchcock

n-nw-optimized-0e7b9ffc07feeb03ff7190c62513066aNorth by Northwest (1959)
Produced and directed by Alfred Hitchcock
Written by Ernest Lehman
Cinematography by Robert Burks
Music by Bernard Herrmann
TCM/Fathom Events, Bowie Regal Cinemas, Bowie, MD (2:16)

The first time I saw North by Northwest was in my college dorm room on a 12-inch screen. I’ve probably seen it at least ten or twelve times since then, but yesterday I saw it in a theater on a big screen (thanks to TCM and Fathom Events) as it was meant to be seen, and boy, did it make a difference. I noticed things I’d never noticed before and was completely caught off-guard by aspects of the film that become apparent only by seeing it in its original format.

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The Late Show (1977) Robert Benton

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The Late Show (1977) (2x)
Written and directed by Robert Benton
Produced by Robert Altman, Scott Bushnell
Cinematography by Charles Rosher Jr.
Warner DVD – library (1:33)

The Late Show is a film I first saw when I was 15 years old, far too young to adequately appreciate it. I hadn’t gained enough life experience, hadn’t seen enough film noir, and felt as if its stars Art Carney and Lily Tomlin were trapped in a movie where they didn’t belong. To this 15-year-old mind, Carney belonged on reruns of The Honeymooners; Tomlin belonged on TV variety shows performing skits as Edith Ann and Ernestine the telephone operator. Yet here they were on the big screen in a… what? A comedy? A crime picture? To make things even weirder, I saw The Late Show in one of the strangest places you can see a movie: the theater of a cruise ship on the way to the Virgin Islands. At the time, I thought little about the movie. Now 40 years later, I embrace it as a rare gem.

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