Stromboli (1950) Roberto Rossellini

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Stromboli (1950)
Directed and produced by Roberto Rossellini
Story by Roberto Rossellini with collaboration by Sergio Amiedi, G. P. Callegari, Art Cohn, and Renzo Cesana
Screenplay by Rossellini and Father Félix Morlión
Cinematography by Otello Martelli
Edited by Roland Gross (uncut version) and Alfred L. Werker (U.S. version)
FilmStruck (1:47)

Stromboli’s full title in Italian reads Stromboli, terra di Dio or Stromboli, Land of God. The complete title is crucial to understanding what Rossellini is trying to convey. The film goes beyond the concept of Italian neorealism, reaching for something larger and yet personal and intimate. Does it succeed?

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The Damned Don’t Cry (1950) Vincent Sherman

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The Damned Don’t Cry (1950)
Directed by Vincent Sherman
Produced by Jerry Wald
Written by Harold Medford and Jerome Weidman, based on a story by Gertrude Walker
Cinematography by Ted McCord
Edited by Rudi Fehr
Costumes/Wardrobe by Sheila O’Brien (Joan Crawford, uncredited consultant)
Warner Brothers
Warner DVD (1:43)

I don’t think most people really understand what an absolute force Joan Crawford was. Watch just about any of her films (especially from the 1940s and early 50s) and you’ll see what I mean. No matter who’s directing the picture, Joan is in charge. She commands the screen and defies you to look away. You don’t even want to look away, even when some of her movies aren’t that good. But this one is.

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My Friend Irma Goes West (1950) Hal Walker

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My Friend Irma Goes West (1950) Hal Walker
Dean Martin & Jerry Lewis Collection Vol. 1 DVD (1:31)

My Friend Irma Goes West is more enjoyable than its predecessor My Friend Irma (1949) in that it’s shorter and features much more of Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis. It’s a bit embarrassing that ditzy Irma (Marie Wilson) is relegated to a supporting role in her own movie, but producers Cy Howard and Hal Wallis recognized that Martin and Lewis were clearly on the rise. Giving them more screen time was a no-brainer even Irma could figure out (eventually).

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An Uncommon Woman in Woman on the Run (1950)

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NOTE: This post is part of a multi-week Detectives and Dames blogathon hosted by Flicker Alley to celebrate the upcoming Blu-ray/DVD releases of Woman on the Run (1950), which costars Dennis O’Keefe, and Too Late for Tears (1949). The main blogathon page may be found at Flicker Alley here, and this tribute is cross-posted at the Flicker Alley site here.

Woman on the Run may be preordered from Flicker Alley here and Too Late for Tears right here. Both are outstanding film noir movies with some great extras, including commentary tracks by the Film Noir Foundation’s Eddie Muller (Woman on the Run) and Alan K. Rode (Too Late for Tears).

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