Movies Watched in May 2016 Part I

Things have been pretty busy around here lately, so May looks to be a rather light month. But we do what we can. Here are some of the films I watched during the first half of May.

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The Straight Story (1999) David Lynch

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The Straight Story (1999)
Directed by David Lynch
Produced by Pierre Edelman, Neal Edelstein, Michael Polaire, Mary Sweeney
Screenplay by John Roach, Mary Sweeney
Cinematography by Freddie Francis
Edited by Mary Sweeney
Casting by Jane Alderman, Lynn Blumenthal
Music by Angelo Badalamenti
Buena Vista Pictures
Walt Disney Home Video DVD – library
(color; 1:52)

The David Lynch Project Part VIII

(The complete David Lynch Project so far)

“Odd” is a word that no doubt comes up frequently when discussing anything related to David Lynch, but a G-rated David Lynch movie produced and distributed by Disney gives odd a whole new meaning.

It gets more odd…

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Lost Highway (1997) David Lynch

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Lost Highway (1997)
Directed by David Lynch
Produced by Deepak Nayar, Tom Sternberg, Mary Sweeney
Screenplay by David Lynch, Barry Gifford
Cinematography by Peter Deming
Edited by Mary Sweeney
Casting by Johanna Ray, Elaine J. Huzzar
Music by Angelo Badalamenti
October Films
Universal UK Blu-ray
(color; 2:15)

The David Lynch Project Part VII

Here’s a statement that will probably be disputed among several readers: David Lynch’s films really aren’t that hard to understand. Oh sure, we may not know what every symbol or image represents (if anything), we may not know if a certain character is a real person or a representation of something else, on and on. Such things we can debate forever, but the basic stories of most of Lynch’s films are pretty clear if you understand one thing:

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Wild At Heart (1990) David Lynch

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Wild At Heart (1990)
Directed by David Lynch
Produced by Steve Golin, Michael Kuhn, Month Montgomery, Sigurjon Sighvatsson
Screenplay by David Lynch, based on the novel by Barry Gifford
Cinematography by Frederick Elmes
Edited by Duwayne Dunham
Casting by Johanna Ray
Music by Angelo Badalamenti
PolyGram Filmed Entertainment, Propaganda Films
Universal Pictures UK Blu-ray
(color; 2:05)

The David Lynch Project Part VI

While my friend K and I have been working on our David Lynch project, it seems as if each film is preparing us for the next one. K and I watched Blue Velvet back in April  and after nearly a six-month hiatus, we’re back. It’s never a good idea to try to label a David Lynch film as any one thing, but if you were to call Blue Velvet a noir mystery (two things), I think you’d have to call Wild At Heart a romantic fantasy. Or a romantic crime fantasy. Or a romantic crime fantasy thriller. Or…

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Blue Velvet (1986) David Lynch

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Blue Velvet (1986) David Lynch
Written by David Lynch
Produced by Fred Caruso, Richard A. Roth
Music by Angelo Badalamenti
Cinematography by Frederick Elmes
MGM
Amazon streaming (rental)
(2:01)

The David Lynch Project Part V

With some films, you lose track of exactly how many times you’ve seen them. I can’t tell you for sure how many times I’ve seen The Maltese Falcon or The Bridge on the River Kwai or even Ghostbusters, but I can tell you very distinctly about the three times I’ve watched Blue Velvet.

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Twin Peaks, Season One (TV 1990)

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Twin Peaks Season One (1990)
8 episodes including pilot

The David Lynch Project Part IV

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Looking at Twin Peaks, you get the feeling that David Lynch was like a kid placed in a room with an enormous amount of toys. Not an unlimited number of toys, but enough to keep him interested for a long, long time. A television series also gave Lynch a longer format to work with, allowing him and co-creator Mark Frost to develop characters and themes, to experiment, to take risks and to explore. Sure, there were restrictions; this was network TV in the early 90s, after all, but it may not be too much of a stretch to say that with Twin Peaks, Lynch was at least partially responsible for pushing boundaries and exploring some unchartered television territory.

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